Changing the Treatment Paradigm in Cancer and Fibrotic Disease

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OUR TECHNOLOGY: CCN SIGNALING

The CCN family of matricelluar signaling proteins has emerged as a unique and highly promising target for therapies in cancer and fibrotic diseases. Using the body's inherent defense and healing systems, we have created biologic-based therapies employed to activate key cellular proteins and/or block specific receptors addressing the underlying biology of these related diseases.

Cancer:

CCN-based biomolecules target the production and modification of cancer stroma / extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell replication/differentiation, creating an environment for re-establishment of complete tissue homeostasis and tumor removal.

Fibrotic Diseases:

CCN-based biomolecules target the control of the activastion of fibroblast-like cells and the resulting altered extracellular matrix (ECM) in response to injury- thus blocking fibrosis generation, and creating an environment for re-establishment of complete tissue homeostasis.

Diagnostic:

A portfolio of diagnostics/theranostics (biomarkers) based on montoring changes in these critical matricellular signaling molecuels and the pathways- a platform for stand alone and paired diagnostics.

BLR Bio is a world leader in the discovery and development of targeted CCN therapies.

© BLR Bio, L.L.C. | 313 54th Street, Kenosha, WI, USA, 53140 | info@BLRbio.com

Latest News

May 2016
"Dr. Bruce Riser, CEO of BLR Bio, was an invited speaker on Peptide Discovery, Preclinical and Clinical presented at the TIDES Oligonucleotide and Peptide Therapeutics Conference, at Long Beach. See selected pre-interview."

April 2016
"BLR Bio was selected as one of the top 50 emerging biotechnology companies to present at the MedCity INVEST, Health Tech Showcase in Chicago April 10-12."

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Publications

April 2016
Balanced Regulation of the CCN Family of Matricellular Proteins: A Novel Approach to the Prevention and Treatment of Fibrosis and Cancer.
Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling 9.4 (2015): 327–339.
PMC. Web. 28 Apr. 2016.

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